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Vasari Corridor in Florence: buy skip-the-line tickets online

The Vasari Corridor in Florence: how to get there, the collection on display, history, opening hours, cost nd prices for purchasing tickets and useful information for the visit.

Vasari Corridor in Florence: buy skip-the-line tickets online

Vasari Corridor in Florence Vasari Corridor - Piazza della Signoria, Galleria degli Uffizi, Ponte Vecchio, Palazzo Pitti, Giardino dei Boboli - Florence

The Vasari Corridor is a state museum that is part of the museum pole of the Uffizi Galleries which also annexes Palazzo Pitti, the Boboli Gardens, the Uffizi Gallery.

The corridor is a singular work designed by Vasari which joins Palazzo Vecchio to the Uffizi Gallery, the Boboli Gardens and Palazzo Pitti with a long covered corridor with a barrel vault, passing over the Ponte Vecchio.

Tickets and Guided Tours including the Vasari Corridor of Florence

Vasari Corridor in Florence: buy skip-the-line tickets online

Tickets available: special afternoon ticket Accademia + Uffizi + Vasari Corridor.

Vasari Corridor in Florence

History of the Vasari Corridor in Florence

The history of the Vasari Corridor is linked to the Medici family, bankers who rose to power in the 13th century and governed Florence for centuries.

In 1560 Cosimo I de' Medici brought together the 13 most important Florentine magistracies, called Uffici, in a single space that could be more easily supervised by him. The choice of location therefore obviously fell alongside the seat that had been the seat of power since the Republic of Florence, Palazzo Vecchio.

In charge of the project was the artist and architect Giorgio Vasari who designed a U-shaped building facing south on the Arno just near Ponte Vecchio. Once the project was completed, Cosimo I de' Medici in 1565 came up with the idea of ​​uniting the ancient seat of power Palazzo Vecchio with the new office space and then up to the Medici residence of Palazzo Pitti.

The new work had the purpose of allowing the Medici to move freely between their residence and the places of Florentine power without danger. Cosimo I was in fact the first Grand Duke of Tuscany and the last exponent of the Republic which had long since died due to the Medici hegemony in the city; something certainly difficult for the other powerful families of the city to accept.

The construction was completed in record time: in just over 9 months from 12 March to 17 December 1565. The only hitch for Vasari was the passage near the Torre de' Mannelli at the southern end of Ponte Vecchio; the Mannellis, an ancient Ghibelline patrician family, opposed the entrance of the corridor into their fortress so that Vasari had to make it go around elevated through a system of corbels that create a characteristic glimpse of the Ponte Vecchio.

For the occasion, the centuries-old meat and fish market that was held on the Ponte Vecchio was moved to avoid unhealthy smells from the "walks of the Grand Duke"; thus the goldsmith shops that are so characteristic of the Ponte Vecchio today arrived on the bridge.

A curiosity: past the Torre dei Mannelli and via de' Bardi, the corridor passes over the loggia of the facade of the Church of Santa Felicita where it overlooks the church with a balcony protected by a gate. In this way the Grand Duke and his family could attend mass without having to take to the streets among the people.
Vasari Corridor in Florence

How to reach the Vasari Corridor in Florence

The entrance to the Vasari Corridor is located in the Piazzale degli Uffizi next to the entrance to the Gallery, right in the center of Florence.

Arrive by train

From Santa Maria Novella Station you can reach it on foot in about 15 minutes (1400 m).

Arrive by bus

The closest bus stop is the Uffizi Gallery on the C1 line (210 meters from the Gallery).

Arrive by car

The closest car parks are Garage Palazzo Vecchio, Garage dei Tintori, Garage Lungarno (for a fee). They are located just 300 meters on foot from the Uffizi Gallery.

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